Crash Twinsanity - High Seas Hi-Jinks


N. Gin's battleship used to be an almost completely different level, with a more haphazardous design and certain mechanics never seen in the final version. This is apparent as early as you venture through the path that leads to the ship proper. In the video below, you'll be able to see what it used to be like as Jon Burton plays through a prototype version.

Although the differences are far too many to list, let's go over the most noteworthy changes.


Outside the Ship
Outside the Ship
Outside the Ship
Outside the Ship
Outside the Ship

Outside the Ship

  • Much like the inside of the ship itself, the outside features a totally different layout compared to the final version. It's a lot less simple, with unused shark enemies jumping out of the water in archs and different crate formations.
  • The ice contains a lot more frozen enemies, including sharks.
  • As demonstrated in the video, all bounce crates in this prototype level visually turn into arrow crates, despite functioning the same otherwise with the exception of not actually giving you fruit.
  • The entrance to the ship is blocked by a barrage of explosives. Crash has to roll a TNT barrel (which is never seen in the final game) next to the explosives and run for cover as the whole thing blows up. Simply touching the barrel seems to ignite its fuse.
  • After the explosives are dealt with, the entrance is guarded by another jumping shark and one of N. Gin's pirate rhinos. This one's holding a sword, and he only goes down after two hits. In fact, all rhino variants take two hits to defeat in the prototype.

Before Meeting N. Gin
Before Meeting N. Gin
Before Meeting N. Gin
Before Meeting N. Gin

Before Meeting N. Gin

  • Something that becomes apparent quite immediately is how the ship's color scheme used to be much more brown and purple, as opposed to the grays and blues used in the final game.
  • There are certain lifts suspended by rope mechanisms that you could activate by repeatedly spinning blue wheels (the same as those you find in Boiler Room Doom). These bore crates you could break if you were fast enough, since the lifts would go back down after a little while.
  • Another removed enemy is the cannon-shooting platypus. He's seen near the beginning of the level, operating a set of three cannons.
  • Some floors had slippery oil puddles. There was even an instance where Crash needed to duck or slide under an arch of Nitro crates suspended above the oil.

Missile Storage
Missile Storage

Missile Storage

  • Although N. Gin's little cutscene where he opens the missile repository was the same, the path in this area was considerably more dangerous. There were missiles with rotating heads that spewed out harmful particles (which never appear in the final version), forcing Crash to go around or jumping over them. Combined with the more narrower bridge and some swinging rhinos that don't usually appear here, it makes sense that this was changed to the simpler and more lenient wobbling platforms of the final game.
  • The barrel-throwing rhino has an animation for when he's defeated (this takes two hits in the prototype), which is actually missing in the final version because he goes down in one hit there.
  • Crash would exit this area through the same passage N. Gin assumedly goes through, but the exit is blocked off by a wall of Nitro crates. It's not demonstrated in the video, but it's possible Crash needed to use the TNT barrel left behind by the defeated rhino to get rid of them.

The Old Ship
The Old Ship
The Old Ship
The Old Ship
The Old Ship

The Old Ship

  • After clearing the missile storage, you'd be greeted by the same rotating platforms from the final version that you need to hit to get across large gaps. This room is largely the same, only with different (and in some cases missing) textures.
  • Instead of a partially flooded room with rotating mechanisms, there was a more traditional room with more missiles launching from below. This room is a good example of how incoherent the crate placement used to be in this level.
  • The second missile storage room was largely similar to the first one in the prototype, as opposed to the more vertical ascent with spring-bearing missiles for you to jump on (of which the prototype has none).
  • This version of the room had a few optional routes and places to visit, such as a small wooden passage that doesn't look like any of the ones seen in the final version. It led to a room filled with bounce crates (the large number of these and their strange behavior in the prototype suggests there was an issue with the crate placement in general).

Rusty Walrus
Rusty Walrus

Rusty Walrus

  • After going through the second missile storage room, you'd be chased by Rusty Walrus immediately, with no cutscene or N. Gin mini-boss leading up to it. The mini-boss did exist (albeit in a completely different form), but it came after the chase scene.
  • Instead of focusing on Crash, Rusty would randomly change directions and start running the opposite way, which was fixed for the final version... at least outside Japan. For some reason, the Japanese release of the game features this same buggy behavior for Rusty.
  • Sometimes Rusty just decided not to break through certain doors and stayed behind, making this chase scene much less traumatizing.
  • The passage Crash and Rusty run through had (of course) a different design and object placement, but it additionally had wood textures not seen in the final version.
  • There was a placeholder cutscene where explosions would start happening inside the ship, with Crash escaping to the deck and meeting a battle-ready N. Gin.

N. Gin
N. Gin
N. Gin
N. Gin

N. Gin

  • Instead of the small, floating, circular arena from the final version, the battle against N. Gin (if you can call it that) would take place on the ship's deck. N. Gin would launch missiles at Crash from afar, and as is so often the case, Crash would need to spin them away.
  • After successfully evading a wave of missiles, N. Gin would fire a bigger, lone missile that Crash had to spin back at him, ending the battle even faster than usual.
  • Despite the placeholder nature of the following cutscene, you could see that N. Gin would fire yet another missile at the deck, which made more sense as to why the ship supposedly sinks in the final version. This also blasted Crash away into a familiar iceberg with two familiar doctors.

Henchmania
Henchmania
Henchmania

Henchmania

  • As usual, beating High Seas Hi-Jinks would pit you against N. Tropy and N. Brio as a tag team. The placeholder cutscene in this prototype just had the two of them in their default T poses, with Brio ever so hilariously sliding off the iceberg and being dunked into the water.
  • The camera wasn't fixed, which made some parts of this fight a bit cumbersome.
  • Brio bounced slower and his animations were jerkier.
  • After getting fed up with chasing Crash, Brio would dive into the water for an attack that was left out of the final version: he'd topple the iceberg with his own weight (using the exact same animation as when he launches Crash off the iceberg in the final version), as TNT crates dropped and rolled down the icy platform. The objective seemed to be stopping a crate on its tracks just long enough for it to explode near Brio, though it's hard to say from the video, since he goes down without this happening the second time.
  • N. Tropy's part of the fight was entirely unchanged besides giving him a landing animation.
  • There was no cutscene after this boss, and the game just seems to stop with Crash tapping his feet. I guess that's one way to stay warm.

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